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Law Exchange Programme and Study Abroad

Studying overseas has the potential to become a life-defining experience and is your chance to learn about global citizenship, explore new cultures, and expose yourself to new ways of learning and new ways of perceiving the world. As a law student, studying law in a foreign jurisdiction is not only valuable on its own merit but it also enables you to re-examine the foundations of the New Zealand legal system through a comparative lens.

Te Piringa - Faculty of Law has specific agreements with a number of law faculties in Europe, North America, and Asia:

Register
your interest

In addition, you may choose to visit law schools in overseas universities other than the ones listed above with which we have signed a university-wide MOU, such as University of Calgary in Canada, and University of Bergen in Norway.

These programmes offer you the opportunity to spend one semester of study towards your degree at one of these institutions in your fourth year of study.

As an exchange student you pay your regular Waikato tuition fees and are able to receive your Studylink loan and allowance. To be eligible you must have completed Year 3 Law and have a sound academic record.

Under the Study Abroad Programme, you would be responsible for international tuition fees as prescribed by the host institution, and you would not still receive your Studylink loan and allowance. The number of students who could enrol in the Exchange Programme for each institution is limited while there are no limits as such for Study Abroad students each year.

For more information or to register your interest, contact Barbara Wallace at barbaraw@waikato.ac.nz or 07 838 4318.


Double LLM: Waikato + Arizona

University of Waikato Te Piringa Faculty of Law and University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law

Interested in holding two LLMs from internationally highly regarded Faculties of Law in significantly less time and in two different countries?

If you’re a dedicated, engaged student then this is the opportunity for you. If you hold an LLB degree (from us or somewhere else), and you have been admitted to our LLM – you could be on your way. Once you’ve completed at least 75% of our LLM you are eligible to receive 6-8 credits towards the requirements for the Arizona LLM. Whether you decide at the beginning of your LLM, or later on; you’ll need to fill out an application that will be carefully considered. If you’re nominated, you’ll need to apply to enroll at Arizona and they’ll make the final decision.

The LLM in Arizona is composed of 24 credit hours (Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy) or 26 credit hours (International Trade and Business Law). If you’ve successfully completed 90 points our LLM, you will receive a credit of 6 hours to the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy LLM OR 8 hours to the International Trade and Business Law LLM at Arizona. This will leave you with just 18 credit hours to complete the Arizona LLM in either of these 2 specialised LLMs.

Double LLM: Waikato + Arizona

University of Waikato Te Piringa Faculty of Law and University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law

Interested in holding two LLMs from internationally highly regarded Faculties of Law in significantly less time and in two different countries?

If you’re a dedicated, engaged student then this is the opportunity for you. If you hold an LLB degree (from us or somewhere else), and you have been admitted to our LLM – you could be on your way. Once you’ve completed at least 75% of our LLM you are eligible to receive 6-8 credits towards the requirements for the Arizona LLM. Whether you decide at the beginning of your LLM, or later on; you’ll need to fill out an application that will be carefully considered. If you’re nominated, you’ll need to apply to enroll at Arizona and they’ll make the final decision.

The LLM in Arizona is composed of 24 credit hours (Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy) or 26 credit hours (International Trade and Business Law). If you’ve successfully completed 90 points our LLM, you will receive a credit of 6 hours to the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy LLM OR 8 hours to the International Trade and Business Law LLM at Arizona. This will leave you with just 18 credit hours to complete the Arizona LLM in either of these 2 specialised LLMs.

What other students have to say...

I chose to spend the last semester of my law degree travelling to Chicago instead of sitting in a classroom. There are many widely-agreed advantages to studying abroad, inter alia: self-development, international networking and added prestige. Today is the morning after the election; I sit in a café by the Chicago River, the atmosphere can only be described as ecstatic.

Like Hamilton, Chicago sits astride a river. It has many liberal and progressive cultural characteristics which make me feel at home. Where Chicago is so different is on its scale. Everything here is grander in possibility. Chicago is America’s home of architecture and every other building, park and street is elegantly designed. Chicago is famous for great food, importantly; it is also one of the few parts of the States where real cup of coffee can be had!

Chicago-Kent College is a first tier law school, so the students and professors it attracts are first class. The hours are long, but the company is great. The friends I have made here include a compliance officer at JP Morgan-Chase and a former JAG attorney in the US Marine Corps; I have professors who, as junior attorneys worked on now-precedent US Supreme Court cases.

My journey continues for now; my final exam is December 21st. I am looking forward to a white Christmas here with new friends before I return to New Zealand to graduate next year. The chance to go on exchange really is one of the greatest opportunities Te Piringa – Faculty of Law offers to its students. I really hope everyone in the junior classes give it the consideration it merits.

Alasdair Long

My exchange in Copenhagen was a fantastic experience and one that I will remember forever. I was initially quite nervous about meeting people and finding my feet, but the University organises so many events aimed specifically at international students that I found I settled in to life there quickly and easily. Soon enough I was enjoying my classes, hanging out with Danish and International friends, learning about the Danish lifestyle and riding my bike everywhere. I had the best semester and by the end was sad to leave and wished I could stay longer. I would certainly visit Denmark again and would recommend doing an exchange to anyone.

Leila Craig

In 2005 I had the opportunity to study at the University of Copenhagen to complete my law degree. I had the most amazing time and met some great friends from all over the world. The experience gave me the confidence to take chances and not be afraid about moving to a new city and trying new things. The experience definitely helped in my decision to move to Auckland and work for Simpson Grierson. I have been at Simpson Grierson for the last four years working in the local government and environment team. Stepping outside your comfort zone is a strength most employers look for. Taking the opportunity to study on exchange is a great way to show prospective employers that you are not afraid to take on a challenge and broaden your experiences. Living and studying in Copenhagen was one of the best times of my life. I thoroughly recommend anyone thinking about it... do it.

Jill Gregory

In 2005 I undertook a semester of study at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. For me this was a logical extension of my law studies, as Copenhagen offers an excellent range of international law papers and international law is a particular interest of mine.

I found studying at Copenhagen University a natural experience, perhaps reflecting the truly international nature of the university. Going to university in Denmark soon took on the easy familiarity of studying in New Zealand. A couple of my favourite things about living in Denmark were the cycling culture (there are biking lanes on every road - but watch out for the bike traffic jams during rush hour!) and the closeness of continental Europe. I also fondly remember always trying my hardest to speak Danish at the Post Office, only to have the assistant respond in perfect English every time.

While in Denmark I applied for a Waikato University Masters scholarship, and my exchange experience in Copenhagen certainly did not hurt my bid. I was granted the scholarship, and began my LLM when I returned to New Zealand. I now work as an in-house solicitor in a team of 7 solicitors at the New Zealand Customs Service, based in Wellington. This role is a constant learning experience, as I am involved in answering legal queries from all areas of the organisation, Court actions, and helping to provide legal training to Customs officers.

Megan Vant

I participated in the Waikato Law School exchange program in 2005. Copenhagen is a beautiful city. The people are friendly, and while the language is incomprehensible at first, it is a lot of fun to try.

Not long after my three week language course, I found part-time work helping at a Smørbrod cafe. Working in a Danish language environment definitely helped to improve my language skills.

For exchange students, there are a variety of law courses to choose from at the University of Copenhagen. I chose the Law of War, Law and Terrorism, and International Development and Human Rights. I really enjoyed my time in Denmark. Many universities operate exchange programs with the University of Copenhagen, so there were students from all over the world in my classes. Throughout the semester, I travelled around Denmark on every available opportunity. After I completed my studies, I spent two months backpacking around Europe and Scandinavia before returning to New Zealand.

After returning from Denmark, I graduated with a conjoint BA/LLB, and went on to complete an LLM. I am currently working as a Rulings Analyst in the Public Rulings Unit of the Office of the Chief Tax Counsel at Inland Revenue.

Rachel Bradley

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