Media Advisory December 09

GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCES $31 MILLION TO RAISE ACHIEVEMENT FOR YOUNG MĀORI
The University of Waikato’s Faculty of Education has been included in a new Building on Success programme that has attracted Government funding of more than $31 million over the next three years. Education Minister Hekia Parata said Building on Success would extend the progress made through current Māori achievement programmes, including the University’s Te Kotahitanga and He Kākano programmes, and the Starpath programme from the University of Auckland. Building on Success will support school leaders and teachers to develop professional leadership and schooling practices, and to deliver the curriculum effectively, to increase educational success for Māori. Approximately a quarter of all secondary schools will be in the programme at any one time. In 2012, almost 61% of Māori 18-year-olds gained an NCEA Level 2 or equivalent qualification – up almost 4% on 2011. The Government has a Better Public Services target of 85% of 18-year-olds having an NCEA Level 2 or better qualification.

REPORT LAYS FOUNDATION FOR NEW LAWS AROUND CARBON DIOXIDE STORAGE
A report just launched in Wellington lays the foundations for new laws around the storage of carbon dioxide as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon Capture and Storage: Designing the Legal Framework was written by University of Waikato law professor Barry Barton - who is the director of the University’s Centre for Environmental, Resources and Energy Law (CEREL) - and researchers Kimberley Jordan and Greg Severinsen. In 2012 Professor Barton received a $245,000 grant from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) to design a legal and regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in New Zealand. He worked with a team including an advisory group, government and industry insiders and international carbon capture experts from Australia, Canada, the United States, the European Union and Norway to draft the framework. New Zealand law currently does not provide for carbon capture and storage, which involves using existing technology to separate carbon dioxide from emissions at sources such as coal burning or natural gas power stations or other industrial sources. The carbon dioxide is then injected into geological formations such as depleted gas reservoirs, or deep saline aquifers.

TEN CLAUDE MCCARTHY FELLOWSHIPS FOR WAIKATO POST-GRADS
Ten of 38 national Claude McCarthy Fellowships have been awarded to University of Waikato PhD candidates. The fellowshipsenable graduates who are registered and enrolled for a doctoral degree at a New Zealand university to travel overseas for short periods to present research work at conferences, and/or conduct research leading towards the New Zealand doctoral degree for which they are enrolled. The fellowships range between $1200 and $5000.

MANAGEMENT SCHOOL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION FINALIST IN RECOGNYZ YOUTH AWARDS
The University of Waikato Management Students Association has been announced as a finalist in the Hamilton Youth Council 2013 Recognyz Youth Awards. The Students Association is a finalist in the Group Award for Active Community Involvement and Volunteering section. The annual awards, hosted by the Hamilton Youth Council, celebrate the successes of Hamilton’s young people, and the organisations that support them. Thirteen young people and three youth organisations have been named as finalists, having been selected for their outstanding contributions to Hamilton and its community. The winners of each category will be announced on December 12. The event will also include entertainment by local youth performers. One finalist will also be named Recognyz Youth Awards Supreme Award Winner 2013.

AWARD HONOURS CONTRIBUTION TO EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
Professor Russell Bishop is the recipient of the prestigious NZ Association for Research in Education McKenzie Award, which honours a significant contribution to educational research over an extended period of time. Professor Bishop has worked for many years in educational research, highlighted by his leadership of the Te Kotahitanga project. Professor Bishop adds to the growing list of Faculty of Education academics who have previously received the McKenzie Award. This group includes David Mitchell (1990), Ted Glynn (2002), Sue Middleton (2003), Clive McGee (2004), Margaret Carr (2005) and Terry Locke (2012). 

KNOWING THE LAND
Lhani Voyle knows the Mokau-Awakino area in northern Taranaki better than most. The Waikato University earth science student has been researching the area for her masters degree and spent six weeks in the field mapping the geology of the area. Her main objective was to better understand the stratigraphic and structural development of the area and how that relates to the eastern margin of the Taranaki Basin and its relationship to the King Country Basin. Back in the lab at Waikato, Lhani then used GIS software to produce a new 1:50,000 geological map of her 840km2 field area. That enabled her to produce a regional west-east trending cross section and describe the different rock formations and different types of deposits. Her degree almost complete, Lhani has landed a job with environmental and engineering consultants Tonkin and Taylor. She’ll be based in Auckland but the company also works in Asia and the Pacific, so she’s hopeful some travel will be involved for projects offshore.

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