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Student Learning: Grammar

Using capitals - Lesson one

  1. 1.1 For starting sentences, proper names and I:

    Capitalisation is used in general to emphasise important things, but must not be over used. At the most basic level every sentence starts with a capital letter, and names of people, geographical locations, days and months must start with a capital. The word 'I' is always a capital.

After reading the initial study, even Simon found the argument unconvincing.

I have only been to Paris once, and I loved it.

  1. 1.2 Names of organisations start with capitals:

The World Health Organisation is based in Zurich, and is a member of the United Nations Development Group.

Helen Clark's husband is a professor in medical sociology in the Sociology Department.

  1. 1.3 Events and brands:

    Events often start with capitals, such as the Cold War, the Norman Conquest, the Big Day Out. Brand names are also capitalised. Non-specific events, such as the opening of the duck shooting season in New Zealand would not be capitalised, but the Kawhia Kai Festival would be (even though the former attracts more participants).

France was the country most affected by the horrors of World War I.

New Zealand has twice made the play-off stage at the soccer World Cup.

Most of the leading manufacturers of sports equipments, such as Nike and Reebok, make their products in third world countries.

  1. 1.4 Documents and acts of parliament and legislation:

    Events often start with capitals, such as the Cold War, the Norman Conquest, the Big Day Out. Brand names are also capitalised.

Police today released a practice guide on the Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act which comes into force this Friday.