Breadcrumbs

Associate Professor Kathie Crocket

Kathie Crocket

Associate Dean Postgraduate Research, Faculty of Education

Keywords

Counselling; Doctoral Education; Education; Health; Human Development and Education; Teaching Ethics and Professionalism

Narrative therapy; counselling ethics; professional supervision; counsellor education; school counselling; research supervision; narrative research; collaborative research.

Qualifications: PhD (Waikato)


Contact Details

Name  Extn.  Username  Room  Department
Crocket, AProf Kathie 8462 kcrocket TT.5.10A Te Oranga Human Development and Movement

You can contact staff by:
  • Calling +64 7 838 4466  select option 1, then enter the extension
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension
    • For extensions starting with 8: dial +64 7 557 extension (TAURANGA exts only)
  • Calling between campuses add 37 to the front of the extension
  • Emailing username@waikato.ac.nz
  • Using the campus map to locate their room

Papers Taught

About Kathie

My teaching is mostly in the MCouns programme, of which I was Director for thirteen years.  I teach and research in counselling with a particular focus on narrative practice, counselling ethics, counselling supervision, school counselling, and counsellor education.

My research contributions in recent years have been shaped by my collaboration in four significant projects.  Two of these projects (a TLRI-funded project in school counselling, and a co-edited book on narrative practice and whakaaro Māori) – are produced in the context of my significant history of research for counselling practice.  Moemoeā:  Maori Counselling Journeys, the co-edited book, was launched in May 2017 - see http://www.waikato.ac.nz/wmier/news-events/book-launch-moemoea-maori-counselling-journeys

The two other projects come out of a more recent and related focus on research for doctoral supervision.  With my colleague, Dr Elmarie Kotzē, Director of Counsellor Education, I are currently involved in writing with colleagues from the University of Edinburgh.  Elmarie and I were jointly awarded the Vice-Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Post-Graduate Supervision in 2011.

I am a Life Member of the New Zealand Association of Counsellors.  I served on the Association's National Ethics Committee for more than fifteen years, and am currently a member of the National Counsellor Education Committee.

Research Supervised

Doctoral theses supervised
  • Morris, B.  (2015).  Heterosexual couples, gender discourses, and the production of relational subjectivity
  • Depree, J.  (2016).Video-recording for therapeutic purposes in couples’ counselling.
  • McMenamin, D. (2014).  New stories of identity:  Alternatives to suspension and exclusion from school.
  • Talbot, W. (2012).  Reflexive audiencing practices for couple relationships-in-action.
  • Yusoff, Y.  (2011). Counselling and religious and spiritual values:  A Malaysian study.
  • Esler, I. (2011). Discursive dissonance: Critical reflexivity for supervison.
  • Arkwright, J.  (2011). Disabled lives:  Exploring positioning, subjectivity and agency.
  • Tootell, A. (2010). The use of self in adolescent sexual offending therapy.  An autoethnographic case study.

Current doctoral thesis supervision

  • Penwarden, S.  Gathering fragments:  Using rescued speech poetry to support stories of hope in the lives of people who have lost loved ones.
  • Snowdon, J.   "But I still love him": Young women talk about love and violence.
  • Graham, J.  An inquiry into how secondary school teachers foster the development of Key Competencies in incidental and unplanned moments.
  • Ling, S. A.  Counselling in the context of suicidal ideation in Malaysia.

Masters theses and dissertations supervised

  • Campbell, J. (2016).  Singleness as a line of flight:  An autoethnographic inquiry.
  • McNaughton, J. (2015).  A personal and professional autoethnography.
  • Rodwell, J. (2014).  Justice in therapy:  An autoethnography.
  • Swann, H. (2014).  An exploration of the therapeutic practices of two Maori whanau therapists
  • Swann B.  (2012). Living Maori stories, living Maori lives:  Beginnings of a whanau therapy practice.
  • Alford, Z.  (2012). A peer professional learning group: A professional identity forum.
  • Walters, L. (2010).  Young mothers:  Using outsider witnessing practices to bring forward stories of mothering.
  • Wolfe, R (2010). How do new practitioners come to understand and effectively use supervision?
  • Davis, E. (2009).  Conversations with men about being men.
  • Harkness, J. (2008).  Cultural conversations in a counselling context.
  • Waters, A. (2008).  Bridging between home and school for Tongan students.
  • O’Brien, S. (2007). Crisis in relation with sexual violence:  Striving for praxis.
  • Te Wiata, J.  (2006).  A local Aotearoa New Zealand investigation of the contribution of Maori cultural knowledges to pakeha identity and counselling practices
  • Pentecost, M.  (2006). The co-production of a literary therapy.
  • Chell, G. (2006).  Out of place:  A narrative, literary inquiry into lived experiences of transnationalism.
  • Depree, J. (2005).  In fairness to children: Some possibilities for narrative family practice in situations where parents have permanently separated.
  • Cook, C.  (2004). The possibility of pleasure?  Reflecting on counselling issues for feminist therapists and women (clients) when exploring the complexities of sexual desire in heterosexual relationships.
  • Darragh, J.  (2004).  The silence inside young women’s stories of heterosexual relationships.
  • Sieuli, B.  (2004).  Mea-alofa – A gift handed over:  The counselling practices of Samoan counsellors in New Zealand.
  • Frayling, M.  (2004). Breaking bad news.
  • Kecskemeti, M. (2003).  Teacher reflection:  Exploring possible contributions from social constructionist supervision.
  • Mandemaker, C.  (2002). Local knowledge and the management of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.
  • Khan, A.   (2002). Having a voice in the Individual Education Programme:  Qualitative research with parents/carers.
  • Buist, J. (2000).  How do facilitators involved in the delivery of potentially controversial material to schools handle resistance and develop resilience?
  • Burns, S. (2000).  Dominant and alternative accounts of working with women who have experienced violence in intimate relationships.

Recent Publications

  • Davis, E., & Crocket, K. (2017). What does it mean to be a man: Effects of witnessing practices. In K. Crocket, E. Davis, E. Kotze, B. Swann, & H. Swann (Eds.), Moemoea: Maori Counselling Journeys (pp. 80-97). Auckland, New Zealand: Dunmore Publishing Ltd.

  • Davis, E., Smith, R., Rifle, J., Te Wiata, J., Swann, H., & Crocket, K. (2017). Te wā: Stories about and in time. In K. Crocket, E. Davis, E. Kotze, B. Swann, & H. Swann (Eds.), Moemoea: Maori Counselling Journeys (pp. 64-68). Auckland, New Zealand: Dunmore Publishing Ltd.

  • Te Wiata, J., & Crocket, K. (2017). Mana wahine. In K. Crocket, E. Davis, E. Kotze, B. Swann, & H. Swann (Eds.), Moemoea: Maori Counselling Journeys (pp. 71-79). Auckland, New Zealand: Dunmore Publishing Ltd.

  • Taylor, R., Crocket, K., & Kotze, E. (2017). Maniaroa: noho marae. In K. Crocket, E. Davis, E. Kotze, B. Swann, & H. Swann (Eds.), Moemoea: Maori Counselling Journeys (pp. 192-203). Auckland, New Zealand: Dunmore Publishing Ltd.

Find more research publications by Kathie Crocket