Breadcrumbs

PhD Student Profiles

 

Giulia Dondoli

Giulia Dondoli

Topic: "Nongovernmental advocacy on LGBTI right to marry and to form a family"

Where I have been:

I completed my Bachelor degree in International Relations and my Master degree in International Studies, both from the University of Siena. As an undergraduate student, I have been a recipient of the Erasmus scholarship, which funded my semester abroad at the National University of Ireland in Galway. Moreover, I pursued an advanced Diploma in Diplomatic Studies at the Institute for International Political Studies (ISPI) in Milan, where I have also collaborated as a research assistant.

Where I am:

In 2014 I joined Te Piringa – Faculty of Law of the University of Waikato. My research studies how nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) influence the creation of new human rights norms. I am very passionate about doing research, writing and sharing the outcomes of my research. During these past few years as a PhD candidate, I have had the chance to present my research at national and international conferences; and I have published peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed papers.

Where I am going:

I am looking forward to complete my PhD and to commit my knowledge and my skills to the service of the community.

Publications, conferences and awards:

Peer-reviewed publications

"Transgender persons' rights in Italy: Bernaroli's case", International Journal of Transgenderism (2016), 1. DOI: 10.1080/15532739.2016.1247404

"Nongovernmental Influence in Foreign Legislation", Vol. 16 No.1, Melbourne Journal of International Law (2015), 124.

Conference papers (selected)

"NGOs work for the capacity building of peripheral partners: towards more democratic advocacy networks", New Zealand Political Studies Conference, University of Waikato, Hamilton (November 2016).

"LGBTI Transnational Advocacy Networks and Capacity Building", 2016 Association for Political Theory conference, Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio USA (October 2016).

"The Heteronormativity of the Human Rights Law: Causes and Consequences" Second Asian Symposium on Human Rights Education, Hiroshima (August 2015).

Scholarships

University of Waikato Doctoral Scholarship (2014)
Leonardo da Vinci Scholarship (2013)
Erasmus Scholarship (2008)

Chief Supervisor

Claire Breen

Contact:

Email: gd27@students.waikato.ac.nz
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/giulia-dondoli-b4b74052/
Twitter: @giuliadondoli1

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Alvina Edwards

Alvina Edwards

Topic: "Counting Indigeneity; Blood Quantum theory in New Zealand; Australia and Canada"

Mihi (in native tongue)

Tena koutou katoa
Tenei te tuku mihi.. kia koutou katoa i raro i ka ahuataka o te wa.

Ko Aoraki te mauka
Ko Waitaki te awa.
Ko Takitimu te waka
Ko Tahu Potiki te takata
Ko Kati Irakehu te hapu
Ko Kai Tahu te iwi
Ko Onuku; Ko Mako oku marae tuturu
Ko te whanau Ropata toku whanau
Ko enei taoka, ko ahau
Ko Alvina Ropata Edwards ahau

“The mountain, Aoraki, is my supreme ancestor under whose mantle the land and all the people living upon it are protected. The Waitaki is also the river that has special significance in the history of my own family. The places that I stand are Onuku and Mako. I belong to the Ropata whanau; the name I was given is Alvina Edwards”

Nga mihi

Where I have been:

I have completed a Bachelor of Laws [LLB]; Bachelor of Arts [BA] in History & Maori Cultural studies / Tikanga Maori- 2011; Masters of Laws [LLM] with First Class Honours- 2012. I have also completed my Professional Legal Studies in 2012.

Where I am:

As a mature student with dependants, I have many responsibilities that must be balanced against the demands of learning. Over the past six years whilst at Law school, the ongoing experiences that I have had as an adult participant has given me a wealth of knowledge and experiences. It has been said, ‘that learning is the pathway to opportunity, and that knowledge is the key to influence’.

The hard work and determination that I can get from following my dreams has been the biggest lesson I learned over all those years. If I want something, even though it seems like it could be impossible, I can have it as long as I find that determination and motivation. I am thoroughly enjoying my post graduate studies; and look forward to being supported in achieving higher.

Where I am going:

My thesis will investigate and expand on existing legal research on Māori and Indigenous Peoples in Australia and Canada. All are communities have been subjected to the ethical, legal and social impacts of the half-blood; half identifiable; half legitimate, half human theories. As the theory of blood quantum continues to disaffect many indigenous peoples, this research will develop new tools to prevent Indigenous Peoples from being trapped within these social constructions. Moreover, my thesis will explore possible preservation techniques; changing the narrative of identity; creating a journey of recovery through narrative knowledge management; to elicit and disseminate knowledge, encourage collaboration, and generate new ideas to ignite change that may protect indigenous peoples from the inexorable use of this concept. Ultimately, Maori, Indigenous Australian and Canadian Peoples need to be the ones in control of their identity and destiny and the manner in which they are defined legally.

Publications, conferences and awards:

I was successful in 2010 and completed an internship programme with Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga;

In 2010, I was one of Twelve Waikato University students that spent a semester break in Canada. There were six management and six law students - all Maori postgraduate or senior undergraduate students. We carried out comparative research on management and law in New Zealand and Canada and the impact on the two countries' indigenous cultures;

I have attended all Maori Law conferences [Hunga Roia o Aotearoa] since 2007; I attended last year’s Worlds Indigenous Lawyers conference;

I have attended the 20th year of Law School – Justice of in the Realm – 2011;

I attended all ‘Harkness Henry Lectures’ since 2007; these are held annually they are intended to address issues relating to the development of New Zealand jurisprudence and are well attended by senior members of the judiciary, the local bar, practitioners, academics and the general public.

I have attended the previous three years of Te Toi o Matariki Conferences; Whilst in Canada I attended the International Conference [Global Ecological Integrity Group]; I presented my research topic on Blood quantum at the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and I presented my research topic from Canada at the Kingitanga Day 2011.

Chief Supervisor

Wayne Rumbles

Second Supervisor:

Dr Rangi Matamua

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Steve Farnworth

Steve Farnworth

Topic: "Civil Liability for Marine Pollution from Offshore Drilling in New Zealand"

Where I have been:

I studied history at Victoria University of Wellington and graduated with honours. I worked as a charitable fundraiser, then as a fitter/turner before earning my diploma of teaching from the Auckland College of Education. I taught mathematics for six years before coming to the University of Waikato to study law in 2005. I graduated with first class honours and was admitted to the bar in 2008. I worked as a solicitor in Hamilton before returning to Waikato to complete my LLM (hons) in 2011. At Waikato I was a tutor for two years, teaching Jurisprudence, Equity and Crimes.

Where I am:

The twin inspirations for my PhD were the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the Rena disaster. I became concerned that, even with the best safety systems and most stringent regulations, there remains a distinct possibility that a major oil spill will result from ultra-deep oil exploration off the coast of New Zealand. My intention is to ensure that New Zealand’s oil pollution liability regime is comprehensive and sufficient to ensure the complete restoration of our marine environment as well as the full redress of all economic damages.

Where I am going:

In 2014 I will travel to the Universität Bremen in Germany where I will spend a year studying the latest EU Directive on offshore exploration liability. I hope to continue my career as an academic, to work in public policy, or as a commercial/environmental barrister and solicitor.

Publications, conferences and awards:

Awards

Conferences

  • Energy at the Crossroads Conference 2013
  • Otago Energy Research Centre Symposium 2011 “Competition Law and Electricity Regulation in New Zealand; A Law and Economics Analysis of the Electricity Authority’s Undesirable Tradition Situation Regime.”
  • “Spiking Prices: How Economics, History and Law have shaped the New Zealand Electricity Authority’s UTS Regime” (University of Waikato Masters thesis, 2011).

Prizes

  • Intercoast Doctoral Exchange Travel Award, 2014
  • University of Waikato Doctoral Scholarship, 2013
  • University of Waikato Masters Research Scholarship, 2011
  • Chicago-Kent Law Exchange Travel Award, 2007
  • LEADR Dispute Resolution Law Prize, 2006
  • Evans Bailey & Co Prize for Jurisprudence, 2005

Chief Supervisor

Professor Barry Barton

Second Supervisor:

Professor Doctor Gerd Winter, Uni Bremen

Third Supervisor:

Dr Sadeq Bigdeli

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Season-Mary Downs

Season-Mary Downs

Topic: "Reconciling the ownership and governance of the takutai moana (foreshore and seabed)."

Mihi (in native tongue)

Ko Mahuhukiterangi te waka
Ko Whiti te tupuna
Ko Kapowai te maunga
Ko Waikare te awa
Ko Te Turuki te marae
Ko Te Kapotai me Ngati Hine nga hapu
No Moerewa ahau

Where I have been:

I was born and raised in Moerewa in the Bay of Islands, Northland. I attended Bay of Islands College before I commenced undergraduate study at the University of Waikato in 2004. In 2008 I graduated with a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Laws. During my time in Waikato I was a board member of with the YWCA of Hamilton and also a member of Te Hunga Roia Maori (The Maori Law Association). In 2009 I moved to Wellington where I worked as a Solicitor on the Maori Legal Team at Kensington Swan Lawyers. In 2010 I commenced part time postgraduate study at the University of Waikato and graduated with a Masters of Law with First Class Honours in April 2013.

Where I am:

I am currently a solicitor in the Maori Legal team at McCaw Lewis Lawyers here in Hamilton, however I am based in Northland where I primarily assist whanau, hapu and iwi claimants with the settlement of their Te Tiriti o Waitangi claims. I have represented many claimants in the Whanganui, East Coast, and Te Paparahi o Te Raki District Inquiries, as well as the Petroleum Inquiry and the East Coast Settlement Inquiry. I also have particular experience in Maori Fisheries matters in the Māori Land Court and Māori Appellate Court. I find this work highly engaging, challenging and rewarding and I am committed to working with the hapu and iwi I represent through to settlement.

Where I am going:

My proposed research topic is Reconciling the ownership and governance of the takutai moana (foreshore and seabed). I am passionate about this topic as I believe that the current ownership and regulatory regime is inconsistent with Te Tiriti o Waitangi and fails to uphold the rights and interests of Maori in the takutai moana. I believe that, in order for the Crown and Maori relationship or Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership to improve, a more equitable regime must be established for the ownership and governance of the takutai moana and other natural resources in this country. The power sharing arrangements between Maori and the Crown must be revisited and there must be a balance between profit driven and conservationist ethics. Through PhD research I wish to explore how Te Tiriti o Waitangi places a positive obligation on the Crown and Maori to resolve such contentions and how Te Tiriti o Waitangi could be the basis of a new ownership and governance regime for the takutai moana. I look forward to working with my supervisors at the University of Waikato over the next three years.

Publications, conferences and awards:

Highly Commended – University of Waikato, Te Toi o Matariki Postgraduate Conference 2012.

Chief Supervisor

Professor Brad Morse

Second Supervisor:

Linda Te Aho

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Rogena Sterling

Rogena Sterling

Topic: "Explore and Review the Current State of the Law and the Reflected Cultural Norms and Develop Concrete Proposals on how these might be Shifted to Provide Space for Gender Indeterminacy."

Where I have been:

I completed a BA degree in 1995 in Linguistics with a sub-major in Earth Science, and began teaching English as a Second Language. I worked in South Korea and New Zealand. Later, I set up and managed my own successful English language school in New Zealand. After selling my school, and some changes in my personal circumstances, it was time to start a new challenge. I decided to study law. Initially, I planned to get my LLB and go to practice immediately afterward. It was during my LLB that I began coming to terms with my identity as an intersexed person.

Where I am:

I am currently beginning studying towards a PhD in Law, having just finished my LLB and LLM. Having adjusted and accepted my personal circumstances and identity as an intersexed person, I felt a duty to take the opportunity to pursue the development of Transgender and Intersex rights to exist and to flourish in ‘legal space’. Dedication to this pursuit started near the end of my LLB, when there were more opportunities to focus ones studies on areas of particular interest and I began serious explorations of intersex issues in law. I extended those legal explorations while gaining my LLM. Throughout my LLM, I felt the inspiration and, in a sense, a duty grow, to continue working in the area, and will use my PhD to provide a foundation for better development of Intersexed Rights. The study requires investigation of how gender and sex has between intertwined within society and how to untwine those concepts, in order to create a space for the intersexed identity to have a place and full participation in society.

Where I am going:

I intend to be part of the frontier in New Zealand and extend on the work done so far in the USA on the rights of the intersexed and the transgendered. Although primarily will focus on the greater picture: academically, politically, and policy wise, I will from time to time be invloved in legal actions to protect and improve intersexed and transgendered rights. I will also do my 'profs' during the next 3-4 years to gain admisssion to the bar. The ultimate goal is to be part of expanding Transgender and Intersex Rights Law and allow the existence of the interesexed identity. There is close connection to the issues of the intersexed, and especially intersexed chidren, and the protecting the rights of children who are different to the norm. I will also advocate for the rights of children when law and policy takes away their rights.

Publications, conferences and awards:

Presented a paper as “Justice in the Round Conference” held at Te Piringa-Faculty of Law – University of Waikato - April 2011

Chief Supervisor

Associate Professor Ruth Busch

Second Supervisor:

Gay Morgan

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Sharon Toi

Sharon Toi

Topic: "The neoliberal logic of post-settlement Maori governance structures. What are the implications for the reshaping of the Treaty of Waitangi relationship between iwi and the Crown"

Mihi (in native tongue)

Ko Whakatere te maunga,
Waimā Tuhirangi te whenua,
Hokianga-o-Kupe te moana,
Ko Māhurehure te hapu,
Ko Ngāpuhi te iwi,
Ko Sharon Toi tōku ingoa.
Tihei Mauriora

Where I have been:

I completed my undergraduate degrees at the University of Auckland where I worked as the Māori Academic co-ordinator for Māori Law students before moving to Wellington to take up a policy role with the Ministry of Women’s Affairs. In 2001 I came to the Waikato to work for Open Wananga, a subsidiary company of Te Wananga o Aotearoa based in Te Awamutu. I completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Studies and moved on to the MBA with the University of Waikato Management School while working in local governmnet in corporate planning and policy. I came to work at the University of Waikato as the Project lead for the development of Te Kotahi Research Centre and completed a LLM with Class 2 Division 1 Honours in 2011. I moved on to work in the School of Māori and Pacific Development in 2012 while completing my first year of PhD study.

Where I am:

I also work as a research consultant in Māori mental health and lately as a Cultural Supervisor for the Department of Corrections. I have returned to full-time PhD study in 2013 and am the grateful recipient of the inaugural Te Mata Hautu Taketake – Māori and Indigenous Governance Centre PhD scholarship 2013. My research intent is to interrogate practical solutions and strategies for iwi to engage in a global political and market economy while retaining and valuing our own very unique identities, values and tikanga. I am looking beyond land use potential for Māori own land and even economic sustainable development, toward the potential for setting a Māori and indigenous governance framework that effectively deals with neoliberalism. An important focus of my research will be to look at the inclusion of Māori women in Māori organisational structures and governance roles. In 2008 I completed my MBA with a major research project looking at Māori Women’s entrepreneurship and the development of a Mana Wahine Theory. It is this work that I wish to build on. This research, while limited in sample size provides valuable insights into Māori women's contributions to a transformative economic agenda for iwi and New Zealand. While it is an agenda that I submit provides avenues for the emancipatory desires of Māori women specifically, there are obvious synergies with the transformation of Māori as a people and as a significant contributor to New Zealand society as a whole.

Where I am going:

My aim is to continue post-doctoral research into indigenous governance and the roles of indigenous women possibly in Canada or the United States.

Chief Supervisor

Brad Morse

Second Supervisor:

Robert Joseph

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