Breadcrumbs

Degree Structures

After taking a good look through the wide range of subjects available here at Waikato, you should have an idea of what you'd like to study. The next step is to choose a degree to suit your interests and career plans.

Single degree structure
[3 Years 360 points]

This is an example of a degree structure with a single major.

Year 1
120pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
100 level
15pts
Year 2
120pts
200 level
15pts
200 level
15pts
200 level
15pts
200 level
15pts
200 level
15pts
200 level
15pts
200 level
15pts
100 level
or above
Year 3
120pts
300 level
15pts
300 level
15pts
300 level
15pts
300 level
15pts
300 level
15pts
200 level
or above
200 level
or above
200 level
or above
Compulsory papers
Major
Minor (optional)
Elective papers

Compulsory papers: Each box represents a paper. Each paper is worth a set amount of points – 15 per paper at 100 level and above. A paper is similar to a topic in secondary school. To complete a paper, you'll be required to participate in a range of lectures, tutorials and practical work. Each paper is assessed and on passing, you will gain points towards your degree.

Level: Papers are taught at different levels. Levels 1-4 are undergraduate papers with level 4 being more advanced than level 1.

For full-time study you would usually do four papers in A Semester and four papers in B Semester.

Major: A major is the main subject in your degree. A double major is when you study two subjects in depth. A single major is 135 points. A double major is 120 points for each major. To graduate with a major in a subject, you need to have completed a certain number of points at various levels, ie at 100, 200 and 300 level for a three year degree.

Year/points: The number of points you will need to achieve if you pass all of your papers each year. A typical full-time workload is 120 points per year. For full-time study you would usually do four papers in A Semester and four papers in B Semester.

To graduate with a major in a subject, you need to have completed a certain number of points at various levels, i.e. at 100, 200 and 300 level for a three year degree.

Elective papers: You may have room in your degree to take papers outside your major or compulsory papers. These are called elective papers. Electives can be from almost any subject.

Minor (optional): This is a subject studied in some depth but not as much as the major subject. Minors are optional.


Double major degree structure [3 Years 360 points]

This is an example of a degree structure with a double major.

Year 1 100 level 100 level 100 level 100 level 100 level 100 level 100 level 100 level
Year 2 200 level 200 level 200 level 200 level 200 level 200 level 200 level 100 level
or above
Year 3 300 level 300 level 300 level 300 level 300 level 200 level
or above
200 level
or above
200 level
or above
Compulsory papers
Major
Second major

For details about the specific structure of each degree refer to the degree tab location at the top of each qualifications page.

Conjoint degrees and double majors

If you're interested in studying more than one subject in depth, you can combine two degrees into a conjoint degree programme.

A conjoint degree is where you study two separate bachelor degrees at the same time. This enables you to complete two degrees in a shorter amount of time than if you studied them separately.

Career outcomes

Employers are increasingly on the lookout for well-rounded graduates with strengths in more than one area. Combining two complementary degrees enables you to develop skills that are transferable across disciplines. This opens up a wider range of career opportunities and means you can pursue your own unique career path, rather than being limited to a single area.

Conjoint degree vs double major

Some programmes are best completed as a double major instead of a conjoint degree. A double major is where you study one degree but focus on two different subjects in depth within that degree; for example, a Bachelor of Social Sciences majoring in Psychology and Political Science.

A conjoint degree is best suited to you if you want to study two very distinct fields, eg science and management. However, if the two degrees you want to study are very similar, or if one is of more interest, you might find that a double major better suits your needs. If you start a conjoint programme and decide partway through that it’s not for you, we can adjust your programme to suit you.

How much does it cost?

Tuition fees are charged per paper that you enrol in, and often these paper costs vary between subjects. As a conjoint student, you won’t pay double the fees that a student studying for a single degree pays as you’ll only be paying for the papers you’re enrolled in.

Planning your programme

At Waikato, many of our degrees may be combined to create a conjoint programme, although some combinations are more common. Conjoint degrees can vary in length and structure depending on the two degrees you choose.

We recommend you chat to our Future Student Advisers about what you’re interested in studying. They can help you decide whether a conjoint degree or double major is better for you, assist with planning your papers, and answer any questions you have.

Our advisers and other University staff are also available throughout your degree to help you make decisions and plan your next steps. To get in touch with an adviser email recruitment@waikato.ac.nz or call 0800 WAIKATO