Breadcrumbs

Locks and traditional alarms can’t keep cyber criminals out, but a University of Waikato researcher has developed an app that can raise the alarm if your home network has been breached.

The key emerging threat for the Internet is the prevalence of compromised systems operated by novice end users inside home networks, especially Internet-of-Things devices. Dr Matthew Luckie, senior lecturer in Computer Science, has been awarded $997,182 to produce a system that will tell non-IT experts when their home network has been compromised, and identify the affected device.

Dr Luckie’s ‘NetStinky’ app has just been launched during Cybersmart Week. He says when the app starts, it will do a quick check to see if there’s anything associated with the network that suggests there is a problem. Then it sits in the background and users can hopefully forget about the fact it is there. “If there’s a problem it will alert you on your screen. You don’t need to obsessively check or anything, it will scan your network regularly.”

The system will build Cyber Capability in novice users, increasing New Zealand's cybersecurity at the household level.  It will investigate how users remediate in response to notification, and the findings will be published in appropriate peer-reviewed venues. The source code for the home router intrusion detection software will also be published using a permissive open-source license, enabling home router vendors to customise and include the software in their products.

If you are wondering about the name, NetStinky indicates that if devices inside a network are compromised, it is a signal of poor network hygiene.

The app is now available in the Apple App store and Google Play store.



Latest stories

Related stories

University of Waikato signs new joint programme with Hainan University

University of Waikato is pleased to announce a new agreement with Hainan University in China…

Security and Crime Wānanga set to bring international specialists together

An international collaboration between University of Waikato’s Te Puna Haumaru - New Zealand Institute for…

endace-scholarship-2022

The future is female: New women in tech scholarship launched

A new scholarship set to support women in computer science and software engineering has been…

Michael Tsai

White hat hacker and cybersecurity graduate protects NZ businesses online

Master of Cyber Security student Michael Tsai spends his days trolling client systems, searching for…

University provides Māori youth with STEM opportunities

It was a taste of University life for 76 Māori high school students from around…

Wānanga works to carve a pathway for Māori Artificial Intelligence

A hui that brought together Artificial Intelligence experts from all over around the motu has…

University design student collaborates with global creative group

A bright blue avatar created by a University of Waikato design student is on show…

Keshav Mahindra

Double major and university at 16

Keshav Mahindra achieved University Entrance and NCEA Level 3, all there was left to do…

Ready, set, cyber challenge

The largest cyber security challenge in New Zealand kicks off this week with students from…

Christopher Beckham

Artificial Intelligence graduate makes waves overseas

Working on one of the oldest machine learning systems at the University of Waikato landed…

Taking on the world in cyber security

A group of computer science students have won a spot to compete in a global…

Annika and Danny

University and iwi collaborate on waiata app

A collaboration between researchers from the University of Waikato’s School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences…