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Time-of-flight technology and internet behaviour secure Kudos Awards for top researchers

6 September 2019

Kudos 2019
Dr Lee Streeter (left) and Dr Matthew Luckie (right) were recognised for their scientific research at this year’s Kudos Awards.

Two University of Waikato researchers have been recognised for their scientific prowess at the Kudos Awards dinner.

Dr Lee Streeter received the Datamars Engineering Award for his work with time-of-flight technology, and Dr Matthew Luckie received the Hamilton City Council ICT Award for his research around the Internet at scale.

The annual Kudos Awards, now in their 12th year, recognise top scientists working in organisations throughout the Waikato region and are New Zealand’s premier regional science excellence awards.

Dr Lee Streeter is researching ways to improve and measure motion in time-of-flight photography.

The cameras Dr Streeter uses measure distance, and allow operators to see how big objects are, how far away they are, and how flat or how round the sides are.

He is also researching how to use time-of-flight photography to measure distance despite motion, and measure the speed and direction of that motion.

Dr Streeter’s cameras have commercial applications such as robotics, or on a farm to measure the shape, size and movement of animals to enhance husbandry.

In horticulture, the camera could be used to identify density and flaws in fruit and vegetables travelling along a conveyer belt.

Dr Matthew Luckie’s research focuses on measurement and analysis of the Internet at scale, and spans understanding of Internet infrastructure, operations, and engineering.

Measurement and analysis of the Internet is a multi-faceted discipline involving engineering, computation, empirical observation, exploratory data analysis, validation and instrumentation creation.

Dr Luckie has demonstrated an ability to make important contributions in all of these dimensions. Through his research he hopes to improve transparency of how the Internet behaves in reality, both technically and economically.

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