Breadcrumbs

University of Waikato climbs international rankings

19 June 2019

For the sixth year running, the University of Waikato has climbed up the QS World University Rankings and now sits at 266 out of 1,000 institutions worldwide.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Neil Quigley says, “We are proud to achieve a sixth consecutive jump in the QS World University Rankings.

“This is a huge accomplishment for the University and something we can all be enormously proud to have achieved.”

Since 2014, University of Waikato has moved up 135 places in the rankings.

Professor Quigley says ‘citations per faculty member’ is the indicator in the rankings for which the University of Waikato is strongest.

“We now rank 72nd globally for citations per faculty member, which is in the top five percent of all ranked institutions.  This is up from 92nd place last year,” he says.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Neil Quigley.

“What this means is that the papers our academics publish are cited by other researchers around the world at a very high rate. This is a specific, indisputable measure of the quality, international standing and impact of the research taking place by faculty members at our Hamilton and Tauranga campuses,” says Professor Quigley.

“For students, this is great news because they can be assured that at the University of Waikato they are studying and undertaking research alongside some of the most respected academics in the world. This experience stands our students in good stead for both their careers and further study,” explains Professor Quigley.

Professor Quigley points to the University’s freshwater, coastal marine and urban ecosystem restoration research as representative examples of the institution’s many internationally renowned programmes of research excellence.

“The University of Waikato’s international standing in these research fields began around fifty years ago when we started a research programme aimed at restoring Hamilton’s freshwater assets.

“Throughout the past five decades, teams have extended this research into coastal and marine and urban ecosystems.  Around 100 students each year are now involved in this research, working with our faculties in Tauranga and Hamilton.  This research involves multi-disciplinary faculty teams from science, law, social sciences and others.  Plus, we’re working with councils, CRIs and other organisations in a partnership approach.

“This particular research programme is recognised around the world for its quality and impact and is cited repeatedly by international researchers in this space.  It’s just one example of the many world-class research teams working under the University of Waikato banner,” explains Quigley.

Professor Quigley says the University worked hard to increase its ranking and aims to continue on an upward trajectory.

“We’ve climbed the QS World University Rankings for six years straight and will work toward another positive jump next year. In addition to pointing out where we excel, the Rankings also highlight areas where we can improve, such as recognition by employers.”

Find out more about the QS World University Rankings.

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