Breadcrumbs

University of Waikato researchers honoured at Royal Society Te Aprārangi awards

10 November 2022

Dr Waikaremoana Waitoki received the Royal Society Te Apārangi 2022 Te Puāwaitanga Research Excellence Award

Two University of Waikato academics were honoured at the Royal Society Te Apārangi awards last night.

Royal Society Te Apārangi Research Honours recognise researchers in New Zealand who have achieved excellence in scholarship or innovation, or who have made a significant contribution to Aotearoa through their research and career.

University of Waikato Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research, Professor Bryony James, says she is enormously proud of  Dr Moana Waitoki and Dr Melissa Derby who were presented with awards at an event in Hamilton, the first of three presentations being held around the country.

Dr Waikaremoana Waitoki is winner of the 2022 Te Puāwaitanga Research Excellence Award, in recognition of her eminent and distinctive contribution to Te Ao Māori, and to Māori and Indigenous knowledge for indigenising the psychology profession.
Dr Waikaremoana Waitoki: 2022 Te Puāwaitanga Research Excellence Award

Dr Waikaremoana Waitoki has been recognised by the Royal Society Te Apārangi as winner of the 2022 Te Puāwaitanga Research Excellence Award, in recognition of eminent and distinctive contribution to Te Ao Māori, and to Māori and Indigenous knowledge for indigenising the psychology profession.

With intentional space-making for Māori and indigenous values, Moana has been a driving force behind curriculum development. She has brought mātauranga Māori, te ao Māori and kaupapa Māori approaches together as an alternative to eurocentric psychology practices. Her exceptional contribution affords psychologists opportunities to learn and to choose tikanga Māori in their practices. The Whiti te Rā and the Mauri Ora Toko models are being used to address mental health and addiction issues, intergenerational trauma, and to develop resilience and enhanced wellbeing for tamariki experiencing emotional issues.

Moana is a Senior Lecturer in Te Pua Wānanga ki te Ao Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies with interests in mātauranga Māori, health/hauora and Māori wellbeing and the social determinants of health. She is also the President of the New Zealand Psychological Society, an advisory member of the Suicide Prevention Office, and a member of the Film and Literature Classifications Review Board.

Dr Melissa Derby (Ngāti Ranginui) is co-winner of the Royal Society Te Apārangi Te Kōpūnui Māori Research Award for early career researchers in recognition of her innovative Māori research with a high standard of excellence and promising trajectory.
Dr Melissa Derby: 2022 Te Kōpūnui Māori Research Award

Dr Melissa Derby (Ngāti Ranginui) has been awarded co-winner of the Royal Society Te Apārangi Te Kōpūnui Māori Research Award for early career researchers in recognition of innovative Māori research with a high standard of excellence and a promising trajectory.

Melissa’s research is aimed at strengthening bilingual preschool children’s early literacy skills in te reo Māori and English. In her award-winning doctoral study, she drew from Māori oral traditions and teaching approaches to co-create a culturally-responsive literacy programme. She used her findings to co-write Talking Together: He Korerorero, an early childhood resource that strengthens kaiako and whanau practice in fostering early literacy skills.

Melissa’s work focuses on the importance of early literacy in young children and she works closely with whānau to encourage in-home learning and the development of foundational literacy skills.

A Senior Lecturer teaching early literacy and human development at the University of Waikato's Tauranga campus and online, Melissa is also co-Director of the Early Years Research Centre at the University of Waikato, and co-Editor of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education's blog, Ipu Kererū.


Latest stories

Related stories

Te Maiea o te Rangi; the sun rises on a new opportunity for te reo

A new opportunity to take te reo to the world has risen at the University…

Get involved and grow - message from global leadership forum

When the opportunity to take part in a Global Leadership forum presented itself to first…

Caws and claws: two new fiction books from Catherine Chidgey

University of Waikato academic and award-winning author Catherine Chidgey launched her seventh novel, The Axeman’s…

Aotearoa’s richest short story prize awarded

The art of the Kiwi short story is alive and well if entries to this…

Language revitalisation through international punk

A misspent youth spent in dive bars and playing in punk bands has been the…

State of Australasia Cities Conference comes to Aotearoa

For the first time in its 20-year history, the State of Australasia Cities Conference will…

Phillida Perry

Student leads Covid-19 documentary on our 'pink-haired scientist' - Dr Siouxsie Wiles

Bachelor of Arts student, Phillida Perry, co-produced Ms. Information, a 90-minute film that follows Dr…

Picturing a better future for children with ADHD

A University of Waikato PhD student is designing picture books for children with Attention Deficit…

‘If only they made better life choices’ – how simplistic explanations of poverty and food insecurity miss the mark

The way we perceive poverty, hunger and household food insecurity is shaped by media, government…

Teacher aide

Teacher aide course fills the gap

A new online course is supporting teacher aides to work with Covid-impacted school students

New era of opera training launched in New Zealand at Waikato University

An opera studio focused on career readiness for talented young New Zealand singers has been…

Do you believe in luck?

New research reveals culture plays a major part in whether people believe in luck and…