Breadcrumbs

Than | then

Video: Ellen's English #8 - Then / Than by Ellen from IckleNellieRose (new tab). (Watching time 3m:33secs)

Than and then sound similar in spoken English (especially in New Zealand English with the Kiwi habit of swallowing vowels) and so often get confused in written English.

Complete the quiz items below to see if you have understood this lesson. Then click the blue arrow at the bottom of the page to check your answers.

Instructions: Hover or tap the questions below to see the reason for the answers given in the quiz.

1. Which of the following two sentences makes the most sense?

❍ i) He enjoyed eating his lunch more than working.
❍ ii) He enjoyed eating his lunch more then working.

i) He enjoyed eating his lunch more than working
Why: In this sentence, 'than' conveys a comparison. The second sentence makes no sense because it has a typo in it.

2. Insert either 'then' or 'than' into the gap provided to signal a consequence for Tom
If Tom does not bring everything on the list _______ he cannot go on the field trip!

then
Why: If you find it difficult to remember 'then' for consequence, look at the "e"s in the word consequence; hopefully that can help you to remember.

3. Select Yes or No depending on whether the each of the following sentences is making a comparison.
i) Max had brought them more food than they could eat. ❍ Yes ❍ No
ii) More people now access the news via the Internet than from traditional sources. ❍ Yes ❍ No
iii) To make money, Jason brought the answers to the exam and then sold them to other students. ❍ Yes ❍ No
iv) She brought her card and then everyone present signed their name on it. ❍ Yes ❍ No

i) ...more food than they could eat
ii) More people ... the Internet than from traditional sources.
Why: 'Than' is only used for comparison.

4. Select the sentence that signals a sequence of two events.
❍ i) I bought my lunch and than raced off to my lectures.
❍ ii) I bought my lunch and then raced off to my lectures.

ii) ...and then raced off to my lectures.
Why: 'Then' for sequences of events