Ask Me Anything sessions: Mon-Fri 9–10 am, 3–4 pm; Wednesday Workshops

Breadcrumbs

LearnFest session details

Printable timetable

Opening keynote: 9.15 - 10 am

Workshops: 10.30 - 11.20 am

Breakout Session 1: 11.30 - 11.50 am

Breakout Session 2: 12.00 - 12.20 pm

Breakout Session 3: 1.00 - 1.20 pm

Breakout Session 4: 1.30 - 1.50 pm

Breakout Session 5: 2.00 - 2.20 pm

Breakout Session 6: 2.30 - 2.50 pm

Closing keynote: 3.00 - 3.20 pm

Key to symbols:

🎤 = kōrero (discussion) session

💻 = online presenter

⚡ = lightning talks (5-minute talks)


Opening keynote: 9:15–10:00am


Teaching with heart: The importance of humanity in a digital age

Associate Professor Kirstine Moffat

Division of Arts, Law, Psychology and Social Sciences, University of Waikato

National Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award Winner 2020

9:15–10:00am in PWC or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

2020 has been an extraordinary year of change and constant adaptation for both teachers and learners. Technology has provided new ways of learning, many of which may find a permanent place in the evolving classroom. Through our cameras and computers, Moodle pages and Zoom classes, technology has helped teachers and students communicate and connect. Yet the events of 2020 have also reinforced the vital need for direct human contact and interaction as we all battle against isolation and alienation. This talk celebrates the foundational role of emotion, empathy, creativity, and humanity in education.

Bio

Kirstine Moffat was born in Scotland and arrived in New Zealand at the age of 7. She was educated at the University of Waikato and Victoria University of Wellington. To date her publications have drawn on her doctoral research, focusing primarily on New Zealand settlement and provincial writing and the way in which this writing helps to broaden understanding of New Zealand social history and culture. A developing research area is nineteenth and early twentieth century feminist writing, in particular the motif of music and what it conveys about femininity. She is currently engaged in research examining the cultural significance of the piano in nineteenth century New Zealand. Kirstine is a co-editor of the Journal of New Zealand Literature.


Workshops: 10:30–11:20am


Workshop 1: Indigenous students, meaningful research, and a podcast

Alice Te Punga Somerville & Wanda Ieremia Allan

University of Waikato

10:30–11:20am in MSB.1.03 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

Although it can feel like teaching and research compete for scarce time, research supervision is one place they intersect. In this workshop we seek to frame and encourage a conversation about the many ways that research projects can provide opportunities for Indigenous students to have meaningful research experiences. In a tertiary context of imploding budgets and shrinking horizons, it is more important than ever to remake and enlarge the vision and practices of the university.

Bio

Alice Te Punga Somerville (Te Ātiawa, Taranaki) writes and teaches at the intersections of Indigenous, Pacific, literary and cultural studies. She is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato. Her first book was Once Were Pacific: Māori Connections to Oceania (Minnesota 2012) and her current project is Writing the New World: Indigenous Texts 1900-1975.’ She also writes the occasional poem.

Wanda Ieremia Allan is a PhD student investigating early twentieth Samoan literary cultures. She is working on developing culturally specific Samoan literacy tools to read this significant corpus of Samoan language literature which has been out of print and circulation for many decades.

Alice & Wanda are co-producers of the podcast 'Writing the New World.'

Workshop 2: Enhanced video annotation (EVA) to support critical thinking/ criticality

Gretchen Badenhorst

ETV

10:30–11:20am in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

Interactive Video, like EVA, is a cornerstone of Flipped Classroom and Hybrid/ Blended Learning Models.

This workshop will consist of:

  • An introduction to ETV Platforms (ETV, ELINK, EVA) - attendees have a little time to explore the catalogue.
  • Sourcing a video to work with (ETV Catalogue)
  • Adding EVA interactions to video (attendees work in EVA Basic, using their chosen video)
  • Quick look at EVA Pro tools, which allow on-screen task completion with full analytics

https://sites.google.com/etv.org.nz/eva-and-e-link-workshop/home

Bio

Gretchen Badenhorst is ETV’s Manager of Educational Services. She has taught languages for almost two decades and has been Head of Department and Faculty, an NZQA external examiner and panel leader for several achievement standards. Gretchen completed an MEd at the University of Auckland in 2014 with a focus on the use of Hybrid Learning in multilevel classes. In 2018 she completed both a National Diploma in Adult Education at SIT and a Postgraduate Diploma in Digital Education at Massey University. Her EdD focusses on the development of criticality through the use of question embedded video. Gretchen’s focus is on facilitating student-centred, interactive learning and teaching approaches in digital environments.

Workshop 3: Bringing online learning to life

Elizabeth Leigh Hynes, Jan Marie Kellow, Stephen Ross &
Mary Jamieson

University of Waikato

10:30–11:20am in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

Many of us were forced into online teaching and learning in 2020 without much background in this medium. Covid-19 became the catalyst for change in all areas of education, challenging the status quo.  So what were the consequences? If you are interested in how it led to digital fluency, enabled student agency, presented cultural challenges and inclusivity challenges, then come along to find out and share what worked and what didn’t in this "tips and strategies" workshop.

  • Discuss and ask the crucial questions so that we can see a way ahead.
  • How did student voice and interactivity become a vital part of the learning?
  • What role did UDL (universal design for learning) play in the success of your online teaching and learning?

Bio

Elizabeth Leigh Hynes, Jan Marie Kellow, Stephen Ross and Mary Jamieson have been working in the digital fluency team, Te Whai Toi Tangata, at University of Waikato, for a combined total of 26 years. This team is committed to building digital fluency among teachers and lecturers alike, so that learners may participate in education both synchronously and asynchronously from anywhere in the world.

Workshop 4: Community engaged education: The ultimate WIL

Roger Strasser

University of Waikato

10:30–11:20am in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Description

Immersive Community Engaged Education (ICEE) developed as a mechanism for achieving social accountability in health professions education. After a brief presentation on the development and implementation of community engaged education, participants will share their experiences to distil the key principles of ICEE. Successful ICEE requires the participation not only of community-based healthcare providers, but also active involvement of the wider community through partnerships with local government, health service administration, education institutions and local business organisations.

Bio

Roger Strasser has a background in Australian rural general practice. He recently joined Te Huataki Waiora School of Health at the University Waikato as Professor of Rural Health, following 17 years as Founding Dean of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine in Canada (NOSM). NOSM is a socially accountable academic institution that has been successful in producing healthcare providers who have the skills and commitment, and choose to serve people living in remote, rural and Indigenous communities.


Breakout 1: 11:30–11:50am


What does it mean to be non-Māori? Unpacking the complexities and specificities in tertiary education spaces 🎤

David Taufui Mikato Fa'avae, Joshua Wetere, Olivera Kamenarac & Jessica Cira Rubin

University of Waikato

11:30–11:50am in MSB.1.03 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

This kōrero brings together Māori and non-Māori teacher educators to critically consider their socio-political and socio-cultural locatedness in tertiary education spaces. Although the non-Māori identities are a necessary reminder of our obligations as settler communities, such a social grouping requires further unpacking of the specificities within. Realising the potentialities within such a diverse grouping and articulating the complexities within is essential if we are to make sense of our collective partnership.

Bio

David Taufui Mikato Fa'avae is the son of Sio Milemoti Fa'avae and Fatai Onevai Fa'avae. David is Tongan and was born in Niue, with heritage links to Samoa. He currently teaches in Te Kura Toi Tangata, Education Division, University of Waikato.

Joshua Wetere is of Ngāti Hauā, Ngāti Paoa, and Ngāti Hikairo. He currently teaches in the Kakano Rua programme within Te Kura Toi Tangata, Education Division.

Olivera Kamenarac is a lecturer in Division of Education at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Her research interests include philosophy in/of education, educational policies and politics, critical pedagogies, education for social justice, teachers’ identities, advocacy and activism.

Jessica Cira Rubin is a lecturer in the Division of Education at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Her research interests include teacher education and the literacy practices of children and adolescents, particularly as those topics relate to priorities of nonviolence and social and ecological justice.

Creating a children's literature MOOC

Dianne Forbes & Nicola Daly

University of Waikato

11:30–11:50am in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

In this presentation we will describe the development of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) in children’s literature for the FutureLearn platform with a focus on the methods used to create dialogic spaces. Regular reflections and conversations between the two course developers (and authors) form the data for this research. Findings are described showing the way in which dialogic interpersonal connections were  achieved in teacher-student and student-student communication.

Bio

Nicola Daly is a senior lecturer in the Division of Education at the University of Waikato. She teaches and researches in the area of children's literature and languages. In 2019-20 she was a Fulbright New Zealand Scholar based at the University of Arizona.

Dianne Forbes is a senior lecturer in the Division of Education at the University of Waikato. She teaches and researches in the area of digital learning and online pedagogies, with an emphasis on the perspectives and experiences of tertiary students and teachers.

Academic integrity in online assessments

Nicole Pepperell, Stephanie Gibbons & Rachel Fulton

University of Waikato

11:30–11:50am in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

This session will explore academic integrity in online assessments.

Bio

Nicole Pepperell is Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato.

Stephanie Gibbons is a Senior Tutor in the Philosophy Programme at the University of Waikato. She has a particular interest in the effective use of technology in teaching.

Rachel Fulton is an Academic Integrity Advisor in the Academic Office at the University of Waikato.

Engaging lectures for online delivery using Moodle

Kirsty Dempster-Rivett & Ryan Bentham

University of Waikato

11:30–11:50am in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Description

During trimester A, Covid-19 triggered a sudden shift to online delivery of our programmes with no time to prepare. Coming into B trimester, we knew in advance we had to adopt a blended and flexible approach to teaching. This approach was an opportunity for lecturers to get creative in developing materials to meet student needs. In this presentation, we discuss the strategies we used to create interesting and engaging materials for Moodle.

Bio

Kirsty Dempster-Rivet (she/her) is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist. She has been a Teaching Fellow at Te Kura Whatu Oho Mauri School of Psychology at the University of Waikato for the last five years. Kirsty enjoys the challenge of bringing to life the interplay between psychological practice and academic knowledge by drawing on a wide variety of resources and teaching methodologies.

Ryan Bentham (he/him) is a PhD candidate in Psychology at the University of Waikato with research interests in mental health, gender, and sexuality. Ryan is also a teaching assistant in Te Kura Whatu Oho Mauri School of Psychology for papers that include topics such as research methods, personality, intelligence, and psychometric measurement.


Breakout 2: 12:00–12:20pm


Tales (or confessions) of FutureLearn providers 101 ⚡

Nicola Daly, Clive Pope & Dan Weijers

University of Waikato

12:00–12:20pm in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

Since the New York Times labelled 2012 ‘The Year of The MOOC’ - the MOOC (Massive, Open On-line Course), this landscape has taken on rapid and unprecedented growth. Several players are now key to that expansion. One of those players is FutureLearn, a platform based at The Open University that includes several affiliated universities from around the globe, including the University of Waikato.  In recent times staff have proposed and constructed courses to feature on FutureLearn.  The cocktail of content, pedagogy and technology throw out challenges to staff as the construction process ensues.  In this session three staff, Dan Weijers, Nicola Daly and Clive Pope, will share their experiences of learning to work in the MOOC world.

  • Will MOOC's cater to the best interests of student learners?
  • What specialized pedagogies will MOOC's promote?
  • Has this latest example of the collision of teaching and technology prompted a rethink of how education could be characterized on a global, institutional and social level?

We hope the session will address the question: "Should I make a MOOC?"

Bio

Clive is an Associate Professor in Te Huataki Waiora School of Health.  He teaches in the area of Sport pedagogy and coaching analysis.  Clive has been teaching on-line since the days of Top Class and has more frequently worked with iTines U and now FutureLearn.

Nicola Daly is a senior lecturer in the Division of Education at the University of Waikato. She teaches and researches in the area of children's literature and languages. In 2019-20 she was a Fulbright New Zealand Scholar based at the University of Arizona.

Dan Weijers is a senior lecturer in philosophy. He is the recipient of two University of Waikato Teaching Excellence awards and an Academic Excellence award. Dan is currently the Coordinator of the Teaching Excellence Awards, the Teaching Advocate, and the Deputy Convener of the Academic Planning Committee for D-ALPSS.

Making group work work: Challenges with Chinese students and the online environment

Lucy Campbell & Sheila Busteed

University of Waikato

12:00–12:20pm in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

After receiving a negative review of a group work project in an Academic English for Engineering paper taught at Hebei University of Science & Technology in China, research into the Chinese perspective on group work was undertaken to adjust the curriculum and assessment. Because of Covid-19, the assessment was transferred to the online environment. This presentation will trace the changes made, the group work strategies presented, the results gained, and future improvements needed.

Bio

Lucy Campbell is a Senior Tutor in the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato.

Sheila Busteed is a Teaching Fellow in the University of Waikato’s international joint programme with Hebei University of Science & Technology (HEBUST).

Using reflective assessments across disciplines 💻 🎤

Alison Jolley

University of Waikato

12–12:20pm in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Description

This session discusses how to integrate reflections into your assessments, using examples from geoscience and tertiary teaching and learning. Reflecting on and about learning develops student metacognitive skills and provides useful instructional feedback for the lecturer. Reflective assessments are appropriate for any discipline and come in many forms, spanning short add on questions through to semester long portfolios or journals.

Bio

Alison Jolley (AJ) is a Lecturer at Te Puna Ako – Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato. AJ is passionate about staff development and provides one-to-one support, runs workshops, and teaches postgraduate papers in tertiary teaching and learning for staff in all disciplines. Her research interests span student learning and staff development, particularly focusing on the emotional and attitudinal impacts of field education in geoscience and related disciplines.


Breakout 3: 1:00–1:20pm


Diversity and inclusion: Learnings from Pacific and Indigenous pedagogies and concepts of wellbeing

Dassia Watkins-Matavalea

University of Waikato

1:00–1:20pm in MSB.1.03 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

In this session, I will lay out some basic principles and pedagogies which research suggests are effective when teaching Pacific learners. I argue that these translate into beneficial pedagogies of inclusion when utilised in diverse tertiary learning contexts.

Bio

Dassia Watkins-Matavalea has worked as a bridging and foundation educator since 2003 and is currently doing a doctorate in this area. Dassia’s research concerns what can be learnt from Pacific and Indigenous pedagogies and concepts of wellbeing to inform culturally inclusive teaching in diverse tertiary contexts.

What's new with English language development at the University? 🎤

Chelsea Blickem

University of Waikato

1:00–1:20pm in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

There are a number of student cohorts within higher education who may benefit from ongoing English language development and support. CeTTL has long supported students with writing, study skills and academic literacy needs, and specific and targeted English language development is a recent addition to CeTTL's services to both students and staff.

This kōrero will give an overview of the range of activities and initiatives underway to support English language development, and will provide an opportunity to find out more, to look at what is planned - and to talk about what else might work to enhance our students' experience, progress and success.

Bio

Chelsea Blickem has a background in applied linguistics and second language acquisition, and was Director of Waikato Pathways College at the University of Waikato for 8 years. Since mid-2019, she has been working in her new role as Director, English Language Development, where she works with students and staff to identify and address a range of language needs.

Is Wikipedia OK after all? An innovation in assessment

Frances Edwards

University of Waikato

1:00–1:20pm in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

Recently greater emphasis is being placed on meaningful assessment in higher education. I will share my research into an assessment method I trialed this year. Students were asked to examine and update publicly available online information (e.g., a Wikipedia entry) giving a rationale for the changes. Their responses provided rich evidence of learning. Additionally, they took some professional responsibility for the provision of better information to the public. This research offers useful insights to aid in the development of assessment.

Bio

Frances Edwards is a senior lecturer in the Division of Education at the University of Waikato. She teaches in initial teacher education and postgraduate education programmes. Her research interests include assessment and teacher development.

Moodle forums: What more can they do? 💻

Laura Gurney

University of Waikato

1:00–1:20pm in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Description

Although Moodle forums are often used to host discussions, they have a range of other functions. I present possibilities for using Moodle forums for teaching and learning (particularly with NET cohorts), including experimenting with layout, hyperlinking, and embedding a variety of file types.

Bio

Laura Gurney is a Senior Lecturer in Te Kura Toi Tangata School of Education at the University of Waikato. She specialises in languages education and applied linguistics.


Breakout 4: 1:30–1:50pm


The impact of Covid-19 on the Student to Student Tuakana-Teina programme

Marion Tahana & Tania Oxenham

WINTEC

1:30–1:50pm in MSB.1.03 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

Semester one this year was not business as usual. During the Covid-19 Lockdown, support departments at Wintec kicked into full online responsiveness.  Within this milieu of change and heightened anxiety, the Student to Student Tuakana-Teina programme continued and quickly adapted to meet the demands of their students.  This presentation focuses specifically on how the everyone responded under these stressful conditions, the issues and surprising outcomes.

Bio

Tania Oxenham is a Senior Māori Academic Learning Advisor in Te Kete Kōnae at WINTEC.

Marion Tahana is a Senior Academic Learning Advisor in the Student Learning Services team at WINTEC.

Developing Moodle quiz activities during the Lockdown

John McDonald-Wharry

University of Waikato

1:30–1:50pm in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

This presentation will share experiences on the development of Moodle quizzes for an engineering science paper during Lockdown. Moodle quiz activities were introduced for use as both learning tools and as assessment items for this paper. This talk will cover aspects such as quiz formats and question design, along with strategies to deter and detect cheating.

Bio

John McDonald-Wharry is a Lecturer in Materials in the School of Engineering at the University of Waikato. His research interests include sustainable materials, biobased polymer composites, and 3D printing. He has been a lecturer in a range of materials science and engineering papers since late 2019.

Transforming teaching: Key elements and outcomes

Karyn Rastrick, Victor Fester & Abby Pinkerton

University of Waikato

1:30–1:50pm in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

The Division of Management have been championing many new initiatives in changing our practices and driving digitally-enabled, student focused learning experiences. Karyn, Victor and Abby will reflect on key elements, learning and outcomes from this process, as well as our response to Covid-19 and the unprecedented move to teaching online.

Bio

Karyn Rastrick is the Director of Digitisation Strategy for the Division of Management at the University of Waikato. She led the development of the WMS Digital Strategy and champions new initiatives to ensure that colleagues are supported in delivering high quality, digitally-enabled teaching and learning experiences. Prior to this Karyn has developed vast experience in teaching and learning in her role as a lecturer for the Division of Management.

Victor Fester is an e-learning designer in the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato where he supports academic staff based across the university’s multiple campuses, both in New Zealand and overseas, in the design and delivery of blended and online courses. He has recently worked closely with Karyn and Abby in the implementation of the WMS Digital Strategy aimed at enhancing online and blended learning in the Division of Management.

Abby Pinkerton has previously worked as an eTut in the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato. She is now an Educational Technologist at Waikato Management School. Abby is a core part of the WMS Digital Innovation Team supporting the development of online courses and digital teaching and learning resources with a key focus on video work.

Perusall: Engaging students to read academic texts 💻

Jason Bednarz

University of Waikato

1:30–1:50pm in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Description

Getting students engaged with (and understanding) required readings can be a challenge, particularly as we work increasingly with offshore students. Perusall, “the only truly social e-reader,” takes a constructionist approach to education and enhances it with a boost of social network style technology.  In this session I will show you how we have used this tool (in Moodle) and what the students have to say about it.

Bio

Jason Bednarz is an English language specialist based in Vietnam supporting the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) and the International Office at the University of Waikato. His position has been focussed on collaboration with the University of Waikato’s partners in Vietnam, and on supporting the online delivery of English as a Second Language (ENSLA) papers, as well as supporting the development of digital English language resources.


Breakout 5: 2:00–2:20pm


Drawing on whakataukī in teaching and learning

Leisa Moorhouse

University of Waikato

2:00–2:20pm in MSB.1.03 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

This session will provide an insight into, and opportunity for discussion on, ways whakataukī (Māori proverbs) can be used in teaching and learning. My kōrero will highlight ways I draw on Māori narratives and values in whakataukī, giving examples of how this can create a richer, deeper understanding and discussion on a range of topics. Space will be given for attendees to share their actual or perceived application of whakataukī to their teaching and learning.

Bio

Ko Leisa Moorhouse ahau (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Pākehā). I am an experienced social work practitioner, educator and supervisor. My private practice includes professional supervision and project work, mainly in Māori spaces. Based on the Tauranga campus, my teaching and learning interests centre around mātauranga Māori and inspiring practice that is authentically grounded on mātauranga and tikanga Māori. I have recently developed a card-based resource tool using whakataukĪ which has grown organically from this mahi.

How to break up with your textbook

Jess Howie & Stephen Harlow

University of Waikato

2:00–2:20pm in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

It is no secret that students' access to, and use of textbooks is problematic. Textbook costs have risen by over 400% over the last 40 years, and a recent NZ study found that 56% of students with an assigned textbook simply went without. This session will provide easy and practical steps towards implementing more affordable and accessible course materials.

Bio

Jess Howie is the Research Services Librarian at the University of Waikato.

Stephen Harlow is a Senior Tutor, Learning Design based at the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato.

Google Assignments: The easier alternative to Turnitin

Roy Larke

University of Waikato

2:00–2:20pm in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

The University of Waikato now has access to Google Assignments, which also integrates with Google Classroom. It is an excellent grading, plagiarism and feedback tool, and a good and quicker alternative to Turnitin.

Bio

Roy Larke is a senior Lecturer in marketing in Waikato Management School at the University of Waikato and a Japanese scholar.

Lightning talks session

2:00–2:20pm in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Talk 1: The rise of the fake reference ⚡ -  Stephanie Gibbons

A student gives a bogus reference when they attribute to an author a point the author does not make. This presentation gives some pointers for spotting fake references, and makes suggestions for how to combat what seems to be a rising phenomenon.

Talk 2: Mahara ePortfolio: What's new? ⚡- Stephen Bright

A brief overview of the new features in Mahara v.20.4 recently installed for University of Waikato staff and students.

Talk 3: Moodle 3.9: What has changed this time? ⚡ - Tracey Morgan

This session will give an overview of the changes you will see in Moodle 3.9


Breakout 6: 2:30–2:50pm


Connection: How can a teacher help students to stay connected?

Myra Williamson

University of Waikato

2:30–2:50pm in MSB.1.03 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

This session will discuss the things I tried during 2020 to keep my students connected with each other, with the paper, and with me as their teacher during the transition to online learning and their sudden loss of physical connection on campus. I found that connection is the most important thing to learning - it is more important than transmitting material/information. If students do not feel connected they will not only stop engaging with the material, but their mental health will also suffer, then no learning will be able to take place. Lecturers can do some simple things to help students feel connected. I will use Xorro with my audience (assuming that they have their own device with them) to get them involved from the beginning of the session and to invite them to contribute their thoughts.

Bio

Myra Williamson is a Senior Lecturer of Law and Convenor of the BA major in Law in Te Piringa Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato. In legal education, Myra is interested in all aspects of legal pedagogy, academic integrity, contract cheating, assessment practices and rubrics. In law, Myra is interested in public international law, comparative law, gender justice, citizenship and statelessness, GCC states' laws, amongst other things.

Free for all!  A panel discussion about creating, adapting, and using OER textbooks

Anne Ferrier-Watson, Jaimie Veale, Richard White & Fiona Tyson

University of Waikato

2:30–2:50pm in MSB.1.20 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/rua

Description

Open Educational Resources (OERs) are teaching, learning and research resources that are free to use and adapt.  OERs challenge the copyright and profit driven paradigm of academic publishing, AND they can save you time! Panelists from the Universities of Waikato (Dr Jaimie Veale), Otago (Richard White) and Canterbury (Fiona Tyson) discuss how they have created, adapted, used or promoted OER textbooks in teaching, and how this has positively impacted student learning.

Bio

Anne Ferrier-Watson has been a Librarian at University of Waikato Librarian for 13 years. She loves Open Educational Resources (OERS) - teaching, learning and research resources that are free to use and adapt - not just because they challenge the copyright and profit driven paradigm of academic publishing, but because they make taxpayer funded scholarship freely accessible, which is good for everyone.

Jaimie Veale is a senior lecturer in the School of Psychology at the University of Waikato.

Richard White is the manager of Copyright and Open Access at the University of Otago.

Fiona Tyson is a subject librarian who supports students and staff in the College of Education, Health and Human Development at the University of Canterbury.

When the student has to draw their answer: Assessing logic online

Stephanie Gibbons

University of Waikato

2:30–2:50pm in MSB.1.21 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/toru

Description

In symbolic logic, students have to draw diagrams when they solve problems. This generates challenges in an online environment, both for learning and for assessment. I present my solutions: open answer questions, including diagrams, which can be successfully assessed through Moodle without specialist software, and without unduly taxing the technical ability of students.

Bio

Stephanie Gibbons is a Senior Tutor in the Philosophy Programme at the University of Waikato. She has a particular interest in the effective use of technology in teaching.

Can you teach entrepreneurship to undergraduate engineers?

Nick Pickering

University of Waikato

2:30–2:50pm in MSB.4.02 or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/wha

Description

Engineers are often seen as the group of people you hand your smart idea over to for manufacture and delivery, then cross your fingers and hope they do not ruin it. As engineers, we often fuel this stereotype by not stepping outside of our specialist box. At the University of Waikato, we believe that engineers, with a little training in creativity, human centred design and business, can start their journey to becoming talented entrepreneurs. To test this belief, we sourced over 20 diverse real world problems from leading Waikato and Bay of Plenty businesses, organised a group of 180 second year students into small groups, taught them Systems Thinking, Design Thinking, Lean Canvas, Project Management, Investment Analysis, Request For Proposal (RFP) and business case writing, then watched the magic happen.

Bio

Nick Pickering is a passionate technology leader and educator in the Engineering Programme at the University of Waikato. He thrives on solving complex problems using a systems approach. Nick's career spans 20 years of international industrial experience within avionics, finance, logistics and manufacturing. His current research interests include: Agritech, Smart Cities, IoT and Digital Twins.


Closing keynote: 3:00–3:20pm


Reflections on a career in tertiary educational computing

Dr Marcia Johnson

Director, Centre for Tertiary Teaching and Learning (CeTTL), University of Waikato

3:00–3:20pm in PWC or join online waikato.ac.nz/go/tahi

Description

With a career of over 35 years in university environments, Dr Marcia Johnson has experienced and reflected on many of the key technological trends in tertiary education. Since 2012 she has been the Director of the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning (CeTTL) at the University of Waikato. Coming from a background in eLearning and evaluation (University of Toronto) and Applied Linguistics (Japan and New Zealand), Marcia has conducted research into the potential of technology to transform tertiary teaching and learning processes.

Bio

Dr Marcia Johnson has a PhD in educational computing from the University of Toronto. She has taught both computers in education and applied linguistics in Canada, Japan, and New Zealand. Originally from Canada, Marcia joined Student Learning as its Director in January 2008 and then was appointed Director to the Centre for Tertiary Teaching and Learning (CeTTL) in October 2012. Marcia and the CeTTL team have introduced a number of cross-disciplinary, cohort-based initiatives to improve the student experience of learning. In particular, the Doctoral Writing Conversation programme has facilitated the development of a range of strategies to help thesis students become successful writers.