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Dr Andreea S Calude

Andreea Calude

Senior Lecturer, Convenor of Linguistics

Qualifications: BA (Linguistics), BSc (Mathematics), MA (Linguistics)(Hons), PhD (Linguistics) University of Auckland, CELTA/Cambridge

Personal Website: https://calude.net/andreea/

About Andreea

I am a Romanian born New Zealander, currently working at the University of Waikato. Previously, I have worked in the UK at the University of Reading, in Mark Pagel's evolutionary biology and applied statistics lab, and in NZ at the University of Auckland, and at AUT University. My research on the use of Māori loanwords in New Zealand English has been funded by the Marsden Fund. I am the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the New Zealand Linguistic Society - Te Reo. I am part of the NZ Institute for Crime Science and Security and have ongoing collaboration links with computer science. I study grammatical and lexical aspects of New Zealand English and, more recently, the use of language on social media. My work typically involves corpus data and quantitative analyses.

I am currently serving on the ALPSS Graduate Committee and am the Graduate advisor for Linguistics, and I  also serve on the ALPSS Research Committee.

For more information please see: My personal website, my Māori loanwords project page or our Kiwi words project page. I also write for popular media, as part of a regular language column in NZ newspapers, Language Matters and I contribute to the Conversation.

Papers Taught

Research Supervised

Current supervision:

Beau Stowers (2021-) "Decolonizing Māori Grammar" (PhD) (with Assoc. Prof. Hēmi Whaanga)

Jessie Burnette (2022-) Medical humanities on social media and beyond (MA) (with Dr. Maebh Long)

Completed theses:

Anita Pu (2015-2020) "Research perceptions of a blended collaborative approach to writing and their practices" (PhD)

Jemma Konig (2016-2019) "Modelling Vocabulary Acquisition in Extensive Reading". (PhD)

Katie Levendis (2017-2018) "Māori loanwords in New Zealand newspaper data - a case-study of Māori Language Week" (MA)

Research Interests

I have worked in various areas of linguistics, including syntax, corpus linguistics, and sociolinguistics. My main current interests concern the use of language on social media platforms. The projects I am involved in aim to understand how speakers and users make use of various platforms to "get things done", including to maintain and rally for their mother or heritage language(s). One area I have a keen interest in is that of language contact, which is the situation when speakers of different languages come into contact with one another. One obvious consequence of such contact is lexical borrowing, an area which I have written about in the context of the use of Māori loanwords in New Zealand English (funded by the Marsden Grant of the Royal Society). Additionally, I continue earlier work investigating the organisation of spoken grammar and the structuring of information in conversation.

Recent Publications

  • Burnette, J., & Calude, A. S. (2022). Wake up New Zealand! Directives, politeness and stance in Twitter #Covid19NZ posts. Journal of Pragmatics, 196, 6-23. doi:10.1016/j.pragma.2022.05.002

  • Calude, A. S. (2021). The history of number words in the world's languages—what have we learnt so far?. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 376(1824). doi:10.1098/rstb.2020.0206

  • Vyas, P., Smith, T., Feldman, P., Dant, A., Calude, A., & Patros, P. (2021). Who is the ringleader? Modelling influence in discourse using Doc2Vec. In Proc IEEE International Conference on Autonomic Computing and Self-Organizing Systems Companion (ACSOS-C 2021) (pp. 299-300). Washington, DC, USA: IEEE. doi:10.1109/ACSOS-C52956.2021.00074

  • Burnett, J., & Calude, A. (2021). Corpus Approaches to Discourse Analysis: Persuasion Strategies in a Large Corpus of #Covid19NZ Tweets. In Korerorero Aotearoa | New Zealand Discourse Conference 8. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ.. Open Access version: https://hdl.handle.net/10289/14703

Find more research publications by Andreea Calude

Keywords

Linguistics

corpus linguistics, cognitive grammar, New Zealand English, (Māori) loanwords, social media language, Twitter, Romanian linguistics